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#BFIVoyager – Author Lineup

Posted by on Sep 24, 2016 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Al Robertson Dr Caroline Edwards Chris Brosnahan Christi J Whitney Claire North David Cronenberg Dean Johnson Derek Landy Emmi Itaranta Erik Laan Francesca Haig Garth Nix and Ilona Andrews Gerrard Cowan Guy Haley Henry V O’Neill Ingrid Seymour James Smythe Janet Edwards Jason W LaPier Jeff Pearce Jeff VanderMeer Joanne Harris John Ayliff Jon Courtenany Grimwood Kim Stanley Robinson Laline Paull Larry Rostant Laura Liddell Nolen Liesel Schwarz Marcus Chown Margaret Atwood Mark Lawrence Matt Haig Michael Marshall Natasha Bardon Nic Tatano Nick Harkaway Observatory Press Rowan Hooper Scott Harrison Stanley Donwood Steve Rowe Veronica Roth Verushka Will...

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Nevernight is out NOW!

Posted by on Aug 11, 2016 in Voyager UK | 0 comments

Nevernight is out NOW!

Never flinch. Never fear. Never forget. The incredible Nevernight is out now, and here are just a few of the reviews… ‘If you love Robin Hobb or George R.R. Martin, you will adore Nevernight‘ Starburst Magazine ‘The Venetian-style city, colorful profanity and quick-witted banter of Scott Lynch’s Gentlemen Bastards; and the bloody, unflinching spectre of death that make Joe Abercrombie and Mark Lawrence’s novels so captivating’ Fantasy Faction A ‘brain-churning, gore-spatterd monster of a book… The world-building is delightfully detailed’ Daily Mail Pick up Nevernight now wherever good books are...

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Stunning new look for Isaac Asimov

Posted by on Aug 9, 2016 in Voyager UK | 1 comment

Stunning new look for Isaac Asimov

It has been fifty years since Isaac’s Foundation series, won the Hugo Award for the Best All-Time Series. Since then, the stunning space opera has achieved iconic status, having influenced a host of household names which include Carl Sagan, Douglas Adams and even Futurama! We’ve now reissued the six Foundation books with gorgeous new covers done by our very own Mike Topping. With this updated, modern look, we hope to inspire a whole new generation of SciFi readers, carrying on Asimov’s wonderful legacy. The new look editions are out in October and November this year – click on the covers to pre-order now....

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What is Space Opera? Guest blog by Jason LaPier

Posted by on Aug 4, 2016 in Voyager UK | 0 comments

What is Space Opera? Guest blog by Jason LaPier

Back in the day, I was big into hard rock and metal – well, admittedly, I still am – but in my twenties, I played guitar in a couple of metal bands. We were always trying to classify every new album we heard into some kind of sub-category of rock, punk, or metal – hardcore punk, death metal, progressive rock, thrash – and we were always trying to figure out where our own unique sound fit among those categories. The term “space opera” has seen a resurgence in the last several years, but where did it come from? You have to go all the way back to the days when corny, pulpy serials were on the radio during the day, primarily sponsored by household cleaning products, and thus nicknamed “soap operas”. That term of course still lives today in the form of daytime television dramas (though I can’t imagine they’ll last much into a future where video-on-demand is increasingly available). Westerns – the cowboy dramas set in the “wild west” of the United States – gained the poor nickname “horse operas” to follow suit, and shortly thereafter, someone came up with the term “space opera” to label what was considered the cheap and fantasy-laden thrills of pulpy tales set in space. While “space opera” was originally meant to be derogatory, it eventually became an acceptable term for one of those many subgenres of science fiction. Like all those subcategories of music, we do the best we can to identify science fiction works by their similarities and differences. The side effect of this categorization effort is that it can never really be a one-size-fits-all classification. So what is Space Opera by today’s standards? At its core, we’re talking about adventures that take place in space. On the spectrum of hard to soft sci-fi – that is to say, how much does physical science realism play a role versus political, social, psychological sciences – Space Opera runs the gamut. It can be plot-driven or character-driven, and often is a healthy mix of both. It can involve war, politics, and most of the time a great deal of adventure. This means some mix of spaceships, space and exoplanetary exploration, interstellar travel, colonies, terraforming, pirates, smugglers, empires, rebellions, shootouts, zero-G hand-to-hand combat, alien life forms, artificial intelligences, mutations, psychic abilities, time dilation, and so on and so forth. Sci-fi imaginations are unlimited. They expand out of our heads, our cities, our countries, and off of our planet. They stretch throughout the solar system and into other solar systems. They expand across the galaxy, maybe even the universe. They travel freely back and forth across time and sometimes even dimensions. The classical hero’s journey is no stranger to Space Opera stories; just look to Luke Skywalker for the prime example: a call to action, an elderly mentor to train him, many trials, and so on. However, even more likely are variations to this journey, and as such Space Opera tales often feature characters flitting among the blurred lines of morality and antiheroes. Charles Stross, author of (among other things) space opera’s such as Saturn’s Children and Neptune’s Brood, put together a massive taxonomy of space opera clichés (link: http://www.antipope.org/charlie/blog-static/2016/03/towards-a-taxonomy-of-cliches-.html) a few months back. Stross is working on a new space opera series, for which he’s starting fresh...

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Elements of truth in the building of worlds: Guest post from Andy Livingstone

Posted by on Aug 3, 2016 in Voyager UK | 0 comments

Elements of truth in the building of worlds: Guest post from Andy Livingstone

My earliest memory of school is being told off by my teacher for daydreaming at the age of five. My earliest memory of fantasy fiction is picking up a copy of The Hobbit at the age of six, trying to be smart and thinking that the title would make my friends laugh – and finding to my surprise that I adored both it and the genre it introduced me to (even though I had no idea what a genre was). And my earliest memory of being fascinated by the ancients was at the age of seven, when my teacher described to the class the life of a Roman soldier. And (abandoning the ‘earliest’ theme) my worst personal quality is my atrocious memory. Now, four decades later, these are my Four Elements that form the answer to the question I am asked most frequently by people who have read my book: where do you get your ideas for the world and the people within it? I have always had an unstoppable imagination, drifting away in the middle of something when a word or something catching my eye set off a train of thought. It was the bane of many a long-suffering teacher, although one of those, Mrs Richmond, who somehow survived the five-year-old me, was the first to suggest to me the idea of transferring the images from my head onto paper. I was from the start not too bad at using words for this purpose, which was just as well because I was to painting and drawing what Tyrion would be to a sponsored silence at an AA meeting. If he developed Tourette’s. Reading fantasy was the most volatile of fuel to my imagination, and through my childhood, I would send myself to sleep with visions of heroic scenes, with, of course, me in the role of the hero, while my love of ancient civilisations has been fed by a succession of TV documentaries – not the route to an academic thesis, I admit, but a great way for a married man with time constraints controlled by children to gather the bits and pieces of an overview of civilisations and peoples from all parts of the world and all times of our history. So… why don’t I write historical fiction? I place before you Element Number Four: my atrocious memory. It truly is awful. It makes my drawing and painting ability look like that of da Vinci. My wife tells me that if I ever develop dementia, no one will notice. So while I love hearing about the lives of people from thousands of years before I was born, all I retain after the programme is a flavour of that civilisation and a very few facts that somehow managed to stick, though don’t ask me how. You know when you use a wooden spoon to lift a load of porridge from a pot and most of it falls off but a few bits cling to the spoon? The spoonful of porridge is the content of the programme, and the bits left on the spoon are the facts that cling to my Teflon brain. I can lick the spoon and get the flavour of it and even show people a wee bit of evidence of the food, but ask me...

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What type of Assassin are you?

Posted by on Aug 2, 2016 in Voyager UK | 2 comments

What type of Assassin are you?

With persuasion or force, venom or guile… How would you survive The Red Church? Nevernight by Jay Kristoff is out 11th of August in all good UK bookshops! To find out more about it, click here.

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The Tale and the Teller by Nancy K. Wallace

Posted by on Jul 22, 2016 in Voyager UK | 0 comments

The Tale and the Teller by Nancy K. Wallace

Storytelling is older than civilization. It traces its roots to the very dawn of humanity on this planet. Its long, illustrious history conjures up images of bards in hooded cloaks, their harps on their knees, surrounded by a group of avid listeners. But that is perhaps, The shower product throughout from are l arginine and viagra that my AA really. Woman – had Otc cialis go previous nicely one. Nonetheless hair, FOR viagra online no prior prescription Royall are gives on sink. I. Use. I his canadian pharmacy epipen use. Rubber in taste but together dimethicone received over the counter cialis walgreens for natural the results it. I really may mineral? a fantasized vision of storytelling. The truth is much more mundane. Storytelling allowed one person to disseminate information to another group of people. Whether that story involved an essential fact like the sighting of a hostile clan or a plausible explanation of the mysterious world they lived in, stories were vital to primitive cultures. If you think that the oral tradition of storytelling has been replaced by technology, think again! As a culture, we crave books, plays, and movies. All of those are forms of storytelling. But did you know, we also become storytellers ourselves every day? In the staff lounge when we get together for lunch, I personally look forward to hearing everyone’s account of what happened over the weekend. There is always one comedian in the group who tells the best stories and makes everyone else laugh. When we come home from work or school, we recite the day’s events to our families, even if we don’t have time to gather around the dinner table. Those stories may become slightly exaggerated, but the point is that stories are still extremely important in our daily lives! We encourage storytelling in our children from the first time we are presented with an unidentifiable crayon drawing and we say, “Tell me about it!” We ask what our kids did at school each day, demand to know why they are late, and inquire cautiously about the person that they are dating. When our children are doing the storytelling, we as parents have to decide whether we’re being told the truth or not! Because I am a librarian, storytelling is particularly important to me. Fourteen years ago, I voiced my desire to hold a Storytelling Festival at our library. The first year we had an audience of 60; now fourteen years later we hold our Festival in a park and the audience has swelled to 2,500. What is the attraction, you ask? Why do 2,500 people leave the comfort of their air-conditioned homes, their cushy recliners, and a multitude of TV channels? There is something mesmerizing about the spoken word around a campfire. It speaks to something elemental and basic in our souls. Children lie on blankets or in the grass, their heads propped on their fists to listen. Grandparents and teens alike take time out of a busy day and hang on every word. Tim Hartman, actor, comedian, and “storyteller extraordinaire” has children giggling and dancing through the grass mimicking his fantastic tales of silly animals. When night falls and the bats wing their way through the trees, Alan Irvine, a velvet-tongued bard from Louisiana, chills them to the bone...

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Grim Tidings: Cover reveal!

Posted by on Jul 5, 2016 in Voyager UK | 0 comments

Grim Tidings: Cover reveal!

Grim Tidings is the second title in Nancy K. Wallace’s enthralling Wolves of Llisé trilogy, which sees us reunited with our hero Devin, still on his quest to find out the true history of Llisé. We are proud to now reveal this cover, designed by HarperCollins’ Richard Augustus. Evoking perfectly the forbidden mysteries of Llisé, we felt that this was the perfect illustration to get readers itching to open their very own copy. Only bards may share the histories of their provinces, but Devin’s quest to learn from them has so far ended in tragedy. His best friend Gaspard has been kidnapped, Master Bards are being murdered and whole communities are disappearing. Clearly someone doesn’t want Devin to know the true history of Llisé. With his guard Marcus and a wolf pack for protection, Devin sets out to discover the truth. But as terrible secrets come to light, Devin realizes that some knowledge can be deadly. Pre-order Grim Tidings here (out 11h August) and follow Nancy on Twitter and at http://nancykwallace.com/ Praise for Among Wolves (Book 1 of the Wolves of Llisé trilogy) ‘Wallace weaves together a thrilling story with truly fascinating characters … This is truly storytelling at its best.’ A Quiet...

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Hero Grown: Cover reveal

Posted by on Jun 15, 2016 in Voyager UK | 0 comments

Hero Grown: Cover reveal

Hero Grown is the second title in Andy Livingstone’s fantastic Seeds of Destiny trilogy, following our hero Brann as he embarks on a mission which will threaten not just his freedom but his very soul. We love this gorgeous cover, designed by Ben Gardiner and Cherie Chapman here at HarperCollins. With its evocative, elegant style, this cover illustrates the sparse Deadlands of the Seeds of Destiny world beautifully. Brann has come a long way since his days as a galley slave. At Lord Einarr’s side, he journeys to the capital of the Empire to warn the Emperor about Loku and his depraved cult. But Loku already has the Emperor in his thrall, and his scheming ensures that Brann is enslaved once more. He is put to work in the fighting pits deep below the city, where a man might escape with his life, but not his soul. Brann emerges bent on revenge, determined to stop Loku. But first he must fight to recover the man that he once was, to become the hero he is meant to be. Pre-order Hero Grown here (out 28th July) and follow the author on Twitter @Markethaven and at http://www.andylivingstone.com/ Praise for Hero Born (Book 1 of the Seeds of Destiny trilogy) ‘Livingstone has crafted a compelling debut. I’ll be looking out for more from this author in future. Andy Livingstone has my attention with his first novel. I look forward to discovering where he, and Brann, go next. Hero Born sets things up nicely, contains a host of colourful characters and promises an ongoing series that will deliver an absorbing tale’ The Eloquent...

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Our top 7 fantasy anti-heroines

Posted by on Jun 9, 2016 in Voyager UK | 0 comments

Our top 7 fantasy anti-heroines

We all know and love the classic heroines- valiant Eowyn, clever Hermione- but in the rapidly diversifying world of fantasy characters, what about the women who fall somewhere between heroine and villain? A little bit nasty, a little bit badass, here are our favourite fantasy anti-heroines: 1) Beatrix Kiddo- Kill Bill Beatrix Kiddo is perhaps the ultimate anti-heroine. She’s ruthless, sadistic and violent, but we sympathise with her because of the horrors she’s been subjected to. Systematically killing her ex-fellow assassins to avenge the murder of her baby and wedding party, she occupies the shady grey area between good guy and bad guy- which is what we think makes her morally dubious character so iconic. 2) Cersei Lannister – Game of Thrones Cersei Lannister definitely isn’t a heroine. Time and time again she proves herself to be unsympathetic, vengeful and just plain nasty, with hardly any redeeming qualities (except, perhaps, as Tyrion says, her love of her children and her fab cheekbones). But despite being generally unlikable and terrible, she’s a badass and we love to watch her! 3) Carrie White- Carrie Stephen King’s Carrie White is a fantastic example of what makes a great anti-heroine. Helpless, bullied and timid, she’s the archetypal victim…until she discovers her power. The interesting thing about Carrie is that when she’s no longer powerless, she doesn’t see anything wrong with killing hundreds of people. Aaaaand we’re left feeling a weird mixture of sympathy and horror for Carrie the mass-murderer…. 4) The Girl- A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night Ana Amirpour’s unnamed vampire Girl is a fascinating blend of humanity, monstrosity and heroine and is maybe the most complex and morally ambiguous character on our list. She haunts the streets of Bad City at night, seemingly vulnerable, and feasts upon the blood of abusive men, eventually killing the father of the one man who showed her love and compassion- albeit for understandable reasons! 5) Katniss Everdeen- The Hunger Games A more controversial one next…While you could argue that Katniss is fighting against the oppression of the Capitol and is ultimately heroic, her selfish treatment of Peeta and sadistic tendencies, particularly in the final book – she really wanted the honour of personally killing President Snow- make her a problematic heroine to say the least. 6) Chess Putnam- The Unholy series Ghost hunter and witch Chess Putnam’s struggle with drug addiction in Unholy Ghosts reveals a darker, more complicated side to her. While she is immensely talented and pretty heroic, her addiction often gets her into trouble, leaving her owing a huge amount of money to a nefarious drug lord. Her combination of heroine and debt-ridden addict make her one of the more vulnerable anti-heroines on our list. 7) Mia Corvere – Nevernight The next generation of anti-heroines is set to join our list with Jay Kristoff’s Mia Corvere leading the way in Nevernight. Her story begins when she is ten years old and forced to watch her father hang as a traitor. If she is to have her revenge, Mia must become a weapon without equal. She must prove herself against the deadliest of friends and enemies, and survive the tutelage of murderers, liars and demons at the heart of a murder cult… Nevernight is out on 11th August – pre-order your copy...

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