#VirtualVoyager: Terry Newman on Writing Comedy in Genre Fiction Part 2

DETECTIVE STRONGOAK AND THE CASE OF THE DEAD ELF author Terry Newman explains the tricky business of being deliberately funny…

 

Following on from my previous discussions into ‘being funny’ and applying it to genre writing, here are my top ten helpful (hopefully) rules for writing genre comedy in novel form.

(1) You have to know, and love, your genre.

I love and read fantasy and science fiction books. I love and read detective books. Nothing is going to spoil my enjoyment of them. Discovering a new author and a new world is a thing of wonder. Remember that love.

 

(2) Never ever laugh at your reader.

You are not writing to have fun at their expense. They are the same as you are; they’re better even, as they don’t feel the need to show off like you obviously do. It’s a sharing thing, laughing at ourselves and not really meaning it (as was said about me once, far too perceptively).

 

(3) Do not neglect your story.

You owe it to your reader to give them a story as well as laughs. It’s having fun with the genre, but detective fiction requires a crime and somebody to sort it all out.

 

(4) Real characters are the funniest.

If you invent a character simply for a single gag then it’ll probably show – so at least make it a good one! Readers will still prefer to find fully rounded people making idiots of themselves, even if they have pointy ears, a chronic UV fear, or are dead.

 

(5) If you’re not laughing, then how can you expect your readers to?

I laugh at my own jokes. One of the best feelings in the world is when a line comes to you as you are writing, so you experience the pay off as it appears on the page; fully formed and gorgeous. It is not a sign of excessive self-abusive.

 

(6) Jokes are not evil.

It does not always have to be about amazing insights and clever juxtapositions of events and characters. A good joke or a clever line helps as well – mind you, they are probably a lot harder to come up with. Jokes are hard, new jokes even harder still.

 

(7) When in doubt, go back to your sources.

There is so much great stuff out there, so read it, and become soaked in it. Absorb it through your pores if possible. Then construct something that works on its own terms and integrate all your influences.

 

(8) Find your hero.

Your audience wants to empathise with your main character, sympathise with them, or even antipathise (maybe not be a real word, should be) with them. Make your hero somebody they want to spend time with, but they do not have to be a protagonist. By that I mean they do not have to be changed by events (much). Leave that for the films.

 

(9) Stay true to your intentions.

Do not slip into parody or pastiche, unless that’s your real intention – in which case you could actually be stepping out of your intended genre. They are rather different beasts, equally pertinent in their own way, but can be rather ephemeral and best explored within the pages of the marvellous Mad Magazine or even in sketch comedy. Is ‘Bored of the Rings’ an actual fantasy novel?

 

(10) Have some fun.

Fun is good. Fun is infectious. Your reader will be able to tell if you are having fun writing and it will encourage them to have some as well.

 

You also have to bear in mind that we are living in a world where many literary types still look down on much ‘genre fiction’. Bless their shrivelled souls and calloused imaginations. There are sadly also some genre enthusiasts who worry about the purity of their favourite form and worry about comedy creeping in. If you have they urge to write genre comedy, ignore them all, and the rest of us will be having a titter, chuckle, giggle and guffaw along with you.

 

I will leave you with the words of the fabulous actor Bill Nighy, a face for genre comedy if they ever made one:

 

‘I don’t do plays without jokes anymore. I’ve retired from those plays. I think it’s bad manners to invite people to sit in the dark for two and a half-hours and not tell them a joke.’

 

And remember it only takes 10,000 hours – so get cracking!

 

You can read Part 1 of Writing Comedy in Genre Fiction here.

You can buy Detective Strongoak and the Case of the Dead Elf here. Follow Terry on Twitter and visit his website.

You can have the joy of seeing Terry at FantasyCon 2015 on the panel Funtasy: Comedy & Humour in Genre Fiction at 7pm on October 23rd.

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