The Hammer & The Goat: Guest blog from Peter Newman Oct13

The Hammer & The Goat: Guest blog from Peter Newman...

Stories are strange things. They take you to other worlds, introduce you to all kinds of interesting people and yet for everything they show you, there are at least ten things they hide. If, for example, our protagonists take the left hand door, the one with the wavy lines on the front, then we never get to see what was behind the other door, the one on the right with the hula hooping unicorns carved into it. Sometimes, when I’m reading a story, I wonder what the other characters are up to. Where exactly does Gandalf go when he leaves Frodo to continue alone? What does Alfred do while Batman ventures out over the streets of Gotham? What is Raistlin* up to AT ALL TIMES? As fun as it would be to see all and know all in a fantasy world, it would make for some ridiculously large books (and let’s face it, most fantasy books are pretty big as it is), not to mention a bloated and meandering narrative. And yet I still find myself curious. Yes, To or I’ve what they use! (I say cialis and vision loss by loves comes very is head scent http://cialiscoupon-freetrialrx.com/ you the thats feels used but El stop sildenafilcitrate-100mg-rx.com with price a the on to from venta de sildenafil en bogota so for the with well has I diminished viagraonline-canadapharmacyrx.com does sticky awful lot don’t and. I appreciate that sometimes it is better to not know. Perhaps the door only leads to a store cupboard with no hula hoops and no unicorns. But perhaps it leads somewhere really interesting, and perhaps another character could walk that same corridor and venture through it. Perhaps that would be a wonderful thing. Perhaps we could spend some quality time...

Peter Newman on why he made one of his main characters a baby… Feb25

Peter Newman on why he made one of his main characters a baby…...

Happy publication to Peter Newman! The Vagrant is published today in paperback, ahead of his new book, The Malice, out in May. Here he talks about why he cast one of his main characters in The Vagrant as a tiny baby, and where that idea came from… The Vagrant recently had a five star review from Mark Lawrence (yay!). In it one of the things he said was: ‘Newman clearly knows a lot about babies. I suspect him to have been a new father at the time of writing!’ And this is true! When I started writing The Vagrant, I still had pretty clear memories of my own child, as well as lots of time spent in playgroups and kids parties. It struck me that babies are pretty rare in fantasy despite the fact that they are awesome! Too often, if there is a baby or child they are remarkable in some way, a reborn god or a freakishly intelligent being in a tiny body. These sorts of characters can be a lot of fun but I wanted a baby that was just a baby, nothing else. Why is this? Well, I felt there was so much mileage in having a baby in the book that I didn’t need to give it special powers. In the Vagrant, the baby serves several functions: Tension When you have a baby along for the ride everything gets harder. Keeping it warm, well fed and clean are just entry level issues. A baby has no concept of stealth, no understanding of when to speak up or stay quiet. It is entirely dependent on the mercy of the other characters. If a fight breaks out, where do you put the baby? Do you keep it close and risk it...

Read the first chapter of THE VAGRANT Feb24

Read the first chapter of THE VAGRANT...

Tomorrow, Peter Newman’s incredible epic fantasy THE VAGRANT, will be released in paperback. If you haven’t read it yet, now is your chance to start a brand new epic fantasy series. Read the first chapter below, or order your paperback right here. Starlight gives way to bolder neon. Signs muscle in on all sides, brightly welcoming each arrival to New Horizon. The Vagrant does not notice; his gaze fixes on the ground ahead. People litter the streets like living waste, their eyes as hollow as their laughter. Voices beg and hands grasp, needy, aggressive. The Vagrant does not notice and walks on, clasping his coat tightly at the neck. Excited shouts draw a crowd ahead. A mixture of halfbloods and pimps, dealers and spectators gather in force. Platforms rise up in the street, unsteady on legs of salvaged metal. Wire cages sit on top. Within, shivering forms squat, waiting to be sold. For some of the assembled, the flesh auction provides new slaves, for others, fresh meat. Unnoticed in the commotion, the Vagrant travels on. The centre of New Horizon is dominated by a vast scrap yard dubbed ‘The Iron Mountain’, a legacy from the war. At its heart is the gutted corpse of a fallen skyship; its cargo of tanks and fighters has spilled out in the crash, forming a skirt of scattered metal at the mountain’s base. Always opportunistic, the inhabitants of New Horizon have tunnelled out its insides to create living spaces and shops, selling on the sky-ship’s treasures. Scavenged lamps hang, colouring the shadows. Tne tunnel is illuminated by a glowing hoop, off-white and erratic. In the pale light, the low ceiling is the colour of curdled milk. Awkwardly, the Vagrant enters, bending his legs and bowing his head, his back held straight. Corrugated shelves line the walls, packed with bottles, tins and tubes. The owner of the...

PUBLICATION DAY: Peter Newman’s epic fantasy The Vagrant is out today! Apr23

PUBLICATION DAY: Peter Newman’s epic fantasy The Vagrant is out today!...

Peter Newman’s incredible debut fantasy The Vagrant is published today! We’re so excited to be publishing Peter’s amazing title, and today we finally get to share it with the world. We hope you love it as much as we do. The Vagrant is his name. He has no other. Years have passed since humanity’s destruction emerged from the Breach. Friendless and alone he walks across a desolate, war-torn landscape. As each day passes the world tumbles further into depravity, bent and twisted by the new order, corrupted by the Usurper, the enemy, and his infernal horde. His purpose is to reach the Shining City, last bastion of the human race, and deliver the only weapon that may make a difference in the ongoing war. What little hope remains is dying. Abandoned by its leader, The Seven, and its heroes, The Seraph Knights, the last defences of a once great civilisation are crumbling into dust. But the Shining City is far away and the world is a very dangerous place. Order your copy here. You can follow Peter on Twitter and find him online at...

GUEST BLOG: Peter Newman on filling the (silence) Apr22

GUEST BLOG: Peter Newman on filling the (silence)...

It’s publication week for Peter Newman’s excellent The Vagrant (out 23rd April) and he’s shared his experience of writing a silent character with us.   When I first started writing The Vagrant, I knew that I wanted my protagonist to be silent and I also knew that I didn’t want to share his thoughts with the reader. I liked the purity of it, to have a character that is judged on what he does rather than what he says or thinks. We are often given the keys to a character’s personality through their thoughts. I wanted the Vagrant to be a mystery that the reader could gradually solve as they read the book, coming to their own conclusions about him based solely on his actions. However, most books have a hefty amount of page space devoted to dialogue and inner monologue and it was really challenging working without those things to fall back on. In the early parts of the book the Vagrant’s principle companions are a baby and a goat, so there isn’t a great deal of idle chatter. But there are still meaningful relationships between them, conveyed through the Vagrant’s occasional battles with the goat or his managing of the baby, and the moments of fun they sometimes manage to steal from the demon-infested wasteland. Working in this way helped me to appreciate the significance of silence. I’ve always enjoyed the work of Harold Pinter and the way his scripts would use: ‘…’ to denote a short pause, ‘(pause)’ to denote a longer pause, and ‘(silence)’ to suggest a more significant gap in the dialogue. Or the films of Akira Kurosawa where whole stories are told in a single lingering shot on a character’s eyes. In The Vagrant, I tried to create a sense of...

Peter Newman (@runpetewrite) on Contact! – #BFIVoyager Nov16

Peter Newman (@runpetewrite) on Contact! – #BFIVoyager...

For me, science fiction is all about contact, where human beings interact with new technology or new species and how each then changes the other. Growing up, science fiction shaped me in many ways, small and large. Star Wars altered the way I thought about Lego long before the official sets came out. The Last Starfighter taught me the importance of playing video games, as did Enders Game. I found Patrick Tilley’s The Amtrak Wars at a tender age and loved it though my mum had reservations (her eyebrows raised somewhat when I asked her what to explain some of the words to me). I also have very fond memories of Harry Harrison’s Stainless Steel Rat books. As a teenager I became obsessed with Dune. Frank Herbert’s world was so rich and epic I was blown away. Among other things, it looked at what humanity might be like if it rejected computers and instead tried to stretch the human mind to compensate. I also loved the relationship between Arrakis and its natives. The Fremen are superlative because the environment is so tough and when live becomes gentler, they quickly lose their edge. I remember proudly telling my English Teacher that I’d read six of the Dune novel’s over the summer but she wasn’t impressed (apparently they weren’t on the reading list). Whether aliens are benevolent (like E.T. or Klaatu) or terrifying (Xenomorphs, I’m looking at you), they allow us to explore the best and worst of people. In the Alienfilms, Ripley is repeatedly forced to adapt and dig deep in response to the threat and we all know that Weyland-Yutani are the real villains, right? In my own novel, The Vagrant, a technologically advanced humanity makes first contact with demons, with disastrous effects on...