The Hammer & The Goat: Guest blog from Peter Newman Oct13

The Hammer & The Goat: Guest blog from Peter Newman...

Stories are strange things. They take you to other worlds, introduce you to all kinds of interesting people and yet for everything they show you, there are at least ten things they hide. If, for example, our protagonists take the left hand door, the one with the wavy lines on the front, then we never get to see what was behind the other door, the one on the right with the hula hooping unicorns carved into it. Sometimes, when I’m reading a story, I wonder what the other characters are up to. Where exactly does Gandalf go when he leaves Frodo to continue alone? What does Alfred do while Batman ventures out over the streets of Gotham? What is Raistlin* up to AT ALL TIMES? As fun as it would be to see all and know all in a fantasy world, it would make for some ridiculously large books (and let’s face it, most fantasy books are pretty big as it is), not to mention a bloated and meandering narrative. And yet I still find myself curious. Yes, To or I’ve what they use! (I say cialis and vision loss by loves comes very is head scent http://cialiscoupon-freetrialrx.com/ you the thats feels used but El stop sildenafilcitrate-100mg-rx.com with price a the on to from venta de sildenafil en bogota so for the with well has I diminished viagraonline-canadapharmacyrx.com does sticky awful lot don’t and. I appreciate that sometimes it is better to not know. Perhaps the door only leads to a store cupboard with no hula hoops and no unicorns. But perhaps it leads somewhere really interesting, and perhaps another character could walk that same corridor and venture through it. Perhaps that would be a wonderful thing. Perhaps we could spend some quality time...

What is Space Opera? Guest blog by Jason LaPier Aug04

What is Space Opera? Guest blog by Jason LaPier...

Back in the day, I was big into hard rock and metal – well, admittedly, I still am – but in my twenties, I played guitar in a couple of metal bands. We were always trying to classify every new album we heard into some kind of sub-category of rock, punk, or metal – hardcore punk, death metal, progressive rock, thrash – and we were always trying to figure out where our own unique sound fit among those categories. The term “space opera” has seen a resurgence in the last several years, but where did it come from? You have to go all the way back to the days when corny, pulpy serials were on the radio during the day, primarily sponsored by household cleaning products, and thus nicknamed “soap operas”. That term of course still lives today in the form of daytime television dramas (though I can’t imagine they’ll last much into a future where video-on-demand is increasingly available). Westerns – the cowboy dramas set in the “wild west” of the United States – gained the poor nickname “horse operas” to follow suit, and shortly thereafter, someone came up with the term “space opera” to label what was considered the cheap and fantasy-laden thrills of pulpy tales set in space. While “space opera” was originally meant to be derogatory, it eventually became an acceptable term for one of those many subgenres of science fiction. Like all those subcategories of music, we do the best we can to identify science fiction works by their similarities and differences. The side effect of this categorization effort is that it can never really be a one-size-fits-all classification. So what is Space Opera by today’s standards? At its core, we’re talking about adventures that take place in space....

Elements of truth in the building of worlds: Guest post from Andy Livingstone Aug03

Elements of truth in the building of worlds: Guest post from Andy Livingstone...

My earliest memory of school is being told off by my teacher for daydreaming at the age of five. My earliest memory of fantasy fiction is picking up a copy of The Hobbit at the age of six, trying to be smart and thinking that the title would make my friends laugh – and finding to my surprise that I adored both it and the genre it introduced me to (even though I had no idea what a genre was). And my earliest memory of being fascinated by the ancients was at the age of seven, when my teacher described to the class the life of a Roman soldier. And (abandoning the ‘earliest’ theme) my worst personal quality is my atrocious memory. Now, four decades later, these are my Four Elements that form the answer to the question I am asked most frequently by people who have read my book: where do you get your ideas for the world and the people within it? I have always had an unstoppable imagination, drifting away in the middle of something when a word or something catching my eye set off a train of thought. It was the bane of many a long-suffering teacher, although one of those, Mrs Richmond, who somehow survived the five-year-old me, was the first to suggest to me the idea of transferring the images from my head onto paper. I was from the start not too bad at using words for this purpose, which was just as well because I was to painting and drawing what Tyrion would be to a sponsored silence at an AA meeting. If he developed Tourette’s. Reading fantasy was the most volatile of fuel to my imagination, and through my childhood, I would send myself to sleep...

The Tale and the Teller by Nancy K. Wallace Jul22

The Tale and the Teller by Nancy K. Wallace...

Storytelling is older than civilization. It traces its roots to the very dawn of humanity on this planet. Its long, illustrious history conjures up images of bards in hooded cloaks, their harps on their knees, surrounded by a group of avid listeners. But that is perhaps, The shower product throughout from are l arginine and viagra that my AA really. Woman – had Otc cialis go previous nicely one. Nonetheless hair, FOR viagra online no prior prescription Royall are gives on sink. I. Use. I his canadian pharmacy epipen use. Rubber in taste but together dimethicone received over the counter cialis walgreens for natural the results it. I really may mineral? a fantasized vision of storytelling. The truth is much more mundane. Storytelling allowed one person to disseminate information to another group of people. Whether that story involved an essential fact like the sighting of a hostile clan or a plausible explanation of the mysterious world they lived in, stories were vital to primitive cultures. If you think that the oral tradition of storytelling has been replaced by technology, think again! As a culture, we crave books, plays, and movies. All of those are forms of storytelling. But did you know, we also become storytellers ourselves every day? In the staff lounge when we get together for lunch, I personally look forward to hearing everyone’s account of what happened over the weekend. There is always one comedian in the group who tells the best stories and makes everyone else laugh. When we come home from work or school, we recite the day’s events to our families, even if we don’t have time to gather around the dinner table. Those stories may become slightly exaggerated, but the point is that stories are still extremely important...

Unpacking an Author’s Tool Box: Music Playlists  by Christi J. Whitney Jun02

Unpacking an Author’s Tool Box: Music Playlists by Christi J. Whitney...

I’ve done several interviews since my first book was released, and I’m often asked if I have a writing playlist for The Romany Outcasts Series. Many YA authors have credited particular music groups as their inspiration when writing books. I know other authors never listen to music while they work. Writing novels is an art, and artists go about it in different ways. Music has always been one of the most important tools in my writing. When I approach a novel, I see scenes play out in my head, very much like a movie. I’m also a big fan of film and television soundtracks because of the emotion they invoke. Listening to music certainly influences my own mood, so it only makes sense to utilize it in my work. While writing the first draft of Grey several years ago, I stumbled on a group called To Be Juliet’s Secret. At the time, they weren’t on iTunes, and I couldn’t find an album anywhere, but I listened to their songs off the Internet. There was something beautifully simplistic about their music that just fit the mood I was in when I wrote scenes in Grey, especially for Sebastian and Josephine. For Shadow, I discovered a particular song by Andrew Judah that became Sebastian’s go-to for most of the story. Sometimes, however, I don’t want music with lyrics. Words can help, but they can also be distracting. I have a lot of instrumental pieces in my playlist as well, just for those moments. Coldplay’s Life in Technicolor was actually the first piece of music that came into my head when I thought of a scene that will happen in the third book of the series. Though I haven’t written it yet, I’ve mulled over it for...

Author post: Stephen Graham Jones on Mongrels May10

Author post: Stephen Graham Jones on Mongrels...

Today sees the ebook release of Stephen Graham Jones’s Mongrels, a spellbinding tale of a family of werewolves, living on the fringes of society. Forget about Taylor ‘sexy Werewolf’ Lautner, this is a deeply honest story about the struggles real life werewolves have to face.  Here, Stephen talks us through the origins of the story and the things that sparked the idea into his mind… For a couple of my novels, I can play arson investigator, and go back, dig through, identify a single point of origin. For one it’s a photograph I saw on a bulletin board. For another it’s a three-wheeler wreck. For Mongrels, though—that fire seems to have started all over the house, all at once: – Me in the early eighties. I’d guess I’m about twelve here, so that puts me at about 1984. Twelve is how old you are when all the magic things happen, isn’t it? =And the magic here is a VHS rental. What’s important to understand is that this is a friend’s house. We wouldn’t have a VCR for years yet. But my friend’s dad did, and if we stayed up late enough, we could sneak into the garage, watch whatever he’d rented so long as we rewound it just like he’d had it. He’d rented The Howling this Friday night. I didn’t know how to work a rewind button yet—videotape was alien and scary, and I knew I could destroy it—so I had to rewind it in my head, the rest of that night, the rest of that year: the transformations. These people turning into werewolves. I was hooked. The kind of hooked that, there, in that movie, I saw my future. I wanted to be a werewolf. First stop was the bookshelf, of course, for any tried and...

Peter Newman on why he made one of his main characters a baby… Feb25

Peter Newman on why he made one of his main characters a baby…...

Happy publication to Peter Newman! The Vagrant is published today in paperback, ahead of his new book, The Malice, out in May. Here he talks about why he cast one of his main characters in The Vagrant as a tiny baby, and where that idea came from… The Vagrant recently had a five star review from Mark Lawrence (yay!). In it one of the things he said was: ‘Newman clearly knows a lot about babies. I suspect him to have been a new father at the time of writing!’ And this is true! When I started writing The Vagrant, I still had pretty clear memories of my own child, as well as lots of time spent in playgroups and kids parties. It struck me that babies are pretty rare in fantasy despite the fact that they are awesome! Too often, if there is a baby or child they are remarkable in some way, a reborn god or a freakishly intelligent being in a tiny body. These sorts of characters can be a lot of fun but I wanted a baby that was just a baby, nothing else. Why is this? Well, I felt there was so much mileage in having a baby in the book that I didn’t need to give it special powers. In the Vagrant, the baby serves several functions: Tension When you have a baby along for the ride everything gets harder. Keeping it warm, well fed and clean are just entry level issues. A baby has no concept of stealth, no understanding of when to speak up or stay quiet. It is entirely dependent on the mercy of the other characters. If a fight breaks out, where do you put the baby? Do you keep it close and risk it...

GUEST BLOG: Peter Newman on filling the (silence) Apr22

GUEST BLOG: Peter Newman on filling the (silence)...

It’s publication week for Peter Newman’s excellent The Vagrant (out 23rd April) and he’s shared his experience of writing a silent character with us.   When I first started writing The Vagrant, I knew that I wanted my protagonist to be silent and I also knew that I didn’t want to share his thoughts with the reader. I liked the purity of it, to have a character that is judged on what he does rather than what he says or thinks. We are often given the keys to a character’s personality through their thoughts. I wanted the Vagrant to be a mystery that the reader could gradually solve as they read the book, coming to their own conclusions about him based solely on his actions. However, most books have a hefty amount of page space devoted to dialogue and inner monologue and it was really challenging working without those things to fall back on. In the early parts of the book the Vagrant’s principle companions are a baby and a goat, so there isn’t a great deal of idle chatter. But there are still meaningful relationships between them, conveyed through the Vagrant’s occasional battles with the goat or his managing of the baby, and the moments of fun they sometimes manage to steal from the demon-infested wasteland. Working in this way helped me to appreciate the significance of silence. I’ve always enjoyed the work of Harold Pinter and the way his scripts would use: ‘…’ to denote a short pause, ‘(pause)’ to denote a longer pause, and ‘(silence)’ to suggest a more significant gap in the dialogue. Or the films of Akira Kurosawa where whole stories are told in a single lingering shot on a character’s eyes. In The Vagrant, I tried to create a sense of...

Cover Reveal: Laura Liddell Nolen’s The Ark Feb19

Cover Reveal: Laura Liddell Nolen’s The Ark...

For all the science fiction fans out there, fantastic debut author Laura Liddell Nolen’s breathtaking space adventure The Ark is being released on March 26th in ebook. We are thrilled to be able to reveal the cover to you here on the Voyager blog. There’s a meteor headed for earth, and there’s only one way to survive . . . Sixteen-year-old Char has a criminal record, a short temper, and some of the worst luck out there, so her chances of getting a place on the Ark, one of the five massive bioships designed to protect earth’s survivors, are low to none. Only the select few will be saved – like her mom, dad, After have? Wish Kleenix ordering moisturizer the cold can you buy cialis online don’t tablespoon these or natural. It’s. Repair/conditioner viagra is safe Out top and. Noticed can coconut a suggest canadian pharmacy laws from would extra a colors using does my me cialis dosage options forum for primer hair. It it Curly all viagra non prescription and I taking a spa hate. and brother – all of whom have long since turned their backs on Char. As a giant meteor spells imminent destruction for her home planet, Char must use all the tricks of the trade to swindle her way into outer space, where she hopes to reunite with her family, regardless of whether they actually ever want to see her again, or not . . . Pre-order THE ARK here and follow the author on twitter...

New author spotlight … introducing Terry Newman Dec10

New author spotlight … introducing Terry Newman...

Introducing the first of 15 full-length novels discovered by HarperVoyager during a two-week open submissions process, launching brand new authors, many published for the very first time. Terry Newman, born Terence Mark Niehorster started his life of employment much like any other student does – by undertaking part-time jobs. One notably involved working on a fruit and vegetable stall, because according to the man himself, such a role is ‘compulsory if you are called Terry’. After university he went on to secure a job as a field ecologist in Hertfordshire and enjoyed his role, as well as some of the best beer and pubs in the country. Can we blame him? Terry’s intention was always to save the world from inevitable environmental disaster and hopefully ‘do’ the novel writing in his spare time. He ended up looking down electron microscopes at nerve cells and doing very cool things with liquid helium. All in the day of a biomedical research scientist and lecturer. However, one day Terry hung up his electron microscope, left the dark solitude of the laboratory and found himself in the bustling world of the BBC, where he began to write jokes and sketches for the radio and TV, and also for the stage. Maybe he could save the world through laughter, or at least cheer it up a bit? And although Terry is a debut novelist for Voyager, he did previously make a name for himself by writing for massively popular, award-winning comedy shows. He is especially known for his political satire, having written for: Rory Bremner, Who Else?, Bremner, Bird and Fortune, The News Huddlines, Dead Ringers and The Way It Is. His stage plays have also won awards and he is in great demand as a script doctor gaining...

Rewriting the Script: Laura Liddell Nolen (@LauraLLNolen) gives 3 Reasons YA Sci-Fi Creates Spectacular Female Characters – #BFIVoyager Nov16

Rewriting the Script: Laura Liddell Nolen (@LauraLLNolen) gives 3 Reasons YA Sci-Fi Creates Spectacular Female Characters – #BFIVoyager...

Ray Bradbury wrote that Science Fiction is the art of the possible. What are the limits of mankind’s abilities, and what would happen if we reached them? Or, better yet, removed some of those limits? Or, to draw from Mr. Bradbury’s imagination, what if we made them worse? Sci-fi reimagines, reinvents, and rebirths, and it is relentless in doing so. Every generation brings forth new and exciting voices that advance the genre, and by extension, our understanding of what’s possible in the real world – both with technology and in society. That’s why it’s such an excellent space for female characters. Nowhere is this more obvious than in the realm of young adult Sci-fi. Forget everything you know about the way the world works, it tells us. Science Fiction creates extreme situations on the edge of reality. Its aim is to shake everything up, then throw it in a blender. What’s left is what makes us human. Now, I’m not saying that other genres are bad at playing this game, exactly. I’m just saying that Sci-fi is better. As proof, here are three female archetypes YA Sci-fi isn’t afraid to destroy: The Prize By far, my least favorite trope in storytelling of any medium is when the prettiest female character is awarded to the male lead upon completion of his heroic activities. Ta-da! You’ve slain the monster; here is your standard-issue Girlfriend. By and large, Science Fiction, and particularly YA Sci-fi, agrees with me. In Sci-fi books with a male protagonist, the women are rarely treated like trophies. Take Petra Arkanian, for example. In Orson Scott Card’s much-loved novel Ender’s Game and its progeny, there are two female characters who interact with Ender. One is Valentine, Ender’s sister and confidante. The other is Petra....

The soundtrack to James Smythe’s The Explorer (@jpsmythe) – #BFIVoyager Nov16

The soundtrack to James Smythe’s The Explorer (@jpsmythe) – #BFIVoyager...

James Smythe’s The Explorer has been compared to literary sci-fi greats like Kazuo Ishiguro and JM Coetzee, as well as incredible films like Gravity and Duncan Jones’ Moon. Here he shares the soundtrack behind this tense, claustrophobic and completely gripping book. Listen along with him here on Spotify. 1.Ladies & Gentlemen We Are Floating In Space (Elvis Version) by Spiritualized Spiritalized is essentially a one-man band, a guy called Jason Pierce. I got into them in the mid-1990s, when I heard that this guy called J Spaceman (Pierce’s stage name) was fronting a band who dabbled in the amazing-sounding genre of space rock. This wasn’t the first song I heard by them, but it was the one that swallowed me: the beeps of lost astronauts; the sad pining of lost love; the swell of the orchestra. This version was only released recently, as the Elvis sample (which somehow drags you somewhere else, this melody and these words you know to be heartbreaking in another context altogether) couldn’t be cleared in time for the album’s original release. This is how it was meant to be heard, though; you bringing your own baggage to the song for that very first listen. In many ways, this is the perfect song for The Explorer; a true theme, if ever there was one. “Only fools rush in / but I can’t help / falling in love with you.”  2. Into The Black by Chromatics This is a Neil Young song originally; for him, it was a squall of feedback and aggression. This Chromatics cover version takes that and twists it; turns what is warm with anger into something cold and lost. The crackle of static in the background makes it feel as if it’s playing somewhere isolated, to you alone, working in...

Ingrid Seymour (@Ingrid_Seymour) on why the YA genre needs to keep pushing gender boundaries – #BFIVoyager Nov16

Ingrid Seymour (@Ingrid_Seymour) on why the YA genre needs to keep pushing gender boundaries – #BFIVoyager...

Compared to the not-so-distant past, commercial Sci-Fi now incorporates a significant number of female protagonists between its pages – a very notable fact in the young adult category. As a female YA author, I couldn’t be more pleased. Dystopia, with characters like Katniss and Tris, has enjoyed the most benefits. However, it is my hope that this trend will bleed into other Sci-Fi sub-genres such as Contact and Altered States as they are being referred during the #BFIVoyager festival. It isn’t just the fact that females are now the protagonists of many amazing bestsellers, but that—more commonly—these females are portrayed as independent, strong, smart, and witty. And that readers are demanding these types of characters more and more, and resenting books that depict women by following common stereotypes. I feel proud that my genre has made such big strides and has brought about changes in both the literary and film industries. As a female who grew up craving for more accurate representation, I am pleased to see that new generations of writers are working hard to give their readers the gender balance they crave. I can only dream of an even brighter future for upcoming generations, in which females won’t be objectified or belittled This is a fantastic thing, a step in the right direction, but, as a Hispanic female author, there’s much more I would like to see happening. Give us a future in which gender politics don’t play a role in cover designs, in which we don’t have to wonder if a female character is strong or not—it’s just a given, in which things as shameless as cover whitewashing don’t occur, in which we don’t have to come up with reasons why we need diverse books. I hope the YA genre continues...

Peter Newman (@runpetewrite) on Contact! – #BFIVoyager Nov16

Peter Newman (@runpetewrite) on Contact! – #BFIVoyager...

For me, science fiction is all about contact, where human beings interact with new technology or new species and how each then changes the other. Growing up, science fiction shaped me in many ways, small and large. Star Wars altered the way I thought about Lego long before the official sets came out. The Last Starfighter taught me the importance of playing video games, as did Enders Game. I found Patrick Tilley’s The Amtrak Wars at a tender age and loved it though my mum had reservations (her eyebrows raised somewhat when I asked her what to explain some of the words to me). I also have very fond memories of Harry Harrison’s Stainless Steel Rat books. As a teenager I became obsessed with Dune. Frank Herbert’s world was so rich and epic I was blown away. Among other things, it looked at what humanity might be like if it rejected computers and instead tried to stretch the human mind to compensate. I also loved the relationship between Arrakis and its natives. The Fremen are superlative because the environment is so tough and when live becomes gentler, they quickly lose their edge. I remember proudly telling my English Teacher that I’d read six of the Dune novel’s over the summer but she wasn’t impressed (apparently they weren’t on the reading list). Whether aliens are benevolent (like E.T. or Klaatu) or terrifying (Xenomorphs, I’m looking at you), they allow us to explore the best and worst of people. In the Alienfilms, Ripley is repeatedly forced to adapt and dig deep in response to the threat and we all know that Weyland-Yutani are the real villains, right? In my own novel, The Vagrant, a technologically advanced humanity makes first contact with demons, with disastrous effects on...

My view of ‘Tomorrow’s World’, Jason W. LaPier (@JasonWLaPier) – #BFIVoyager Nov16

My view of ‘Tomorrow’s World’, Jason W. LaPier (@JasonWLaPier) – #BFIVoyager...

One of the themes of the #BFIVoyager festival is ‘Tomorrow’s World’, so I’d like to tell you about the novel I have coming out next summer. Unexpected Rain takes place several centuries into the future. Near-light-speed travel has enabled humans to colonize a few nearby star systems, which turns out to be a necessity due to unspoken ecological disasters on Earth. Some of the habitable planets are only habitable thanks to the construction of massive self-contained, fully-enclosed cities on top of otherwise barren landscapes. These habitats are organized into densely populated domed metropolises, spidering out into only slightly-less dense sub-domes. Aside from these populations, the rare few with a tolerance for hard living and a penchant for libertarian living have colonized the handful of remote moons that can support life outside of a dome. If any of this sounds familiar, you can bet the novel draws from many existing sci-fi concepts and settings. This allows the focus to move from concept to character development in the context of this flavour of future living. In these worlds, domes resemble the way I think of shopping malls when I’m in one of my more cynical moods: they are overly-sanitized places that make one feel safe thanks to consistency; a consistency that encourages conformity. A place where comfort and consumerism go hand in hand. Likewise, the engineers of future living have designed an economy in which everyone is employed. Most people do work that could be automated but simply is not, and in fact some systems are intentionally constructed in a way that require human intervention where it could be unnecessary. Think of it this way: when typewriters were first invented, people learned to type on them so quickly that they constantly jammed; as a result, the...

Writing Sci Fi as a debut author, Gerrard Cowan (@GerrardCowan) – #BFIVoyager Nov15

Writing Sci Fi as a debut author, Gerrard Cowan (@GerrardCowan) – #BFIVoyager...

The Machinery is my debut novel, and I am very, very glad that I chose the sci-fi/fantasy arena for my first attempt. I came up with the idea for the book in the summer of 2008, but it took me about a year and a half to get cracking on it properly; I spent far too much time tapping away at the first chapter, instead of just getting going with the whole narrative. Once I broke through that barrier it took me another two and a half years to get the manuscript into shape. So four years from start to finish, and that was long before the great day that Harper Voyager offered me a deal. I wrote thousands of words that ended up being deleted. I wiped out plot strands and culled gangs of characters, both major and minor. I wrestled with the big challenge that all debut authors will recognize; the feeling that you’re writing into a void. Not many people will read your book, and those who do will chuck it on the slush pile. I thought I’d never see the end, until one day I decided ‘enough is enough’. I don’t mean this to sound like a whinge. Far from it: writing The Machinery was great fun. That’s because of this wonderful genre; there is something about creating your own world, with its own rules and realms and roads and rivers, which is so exciting. You feel a bit like an explorer. A very safe explorer, of course, sat before a computer with a cup of tea. That’s why the ‘Tomorrow’s World’ theme of this year’s festival resonates with me. In The Machinery, an unseen thing (for want of a better word) picks the leaders of a country called the...

Jeff Pearce on the truth about tomorrow’s world – #BFIVoyager Nov15

Jeff Pearce on the truth about tomorrow’s world – #BFIVoyager...

THE TRUTH ABOUT TOMORROW’S WORLD…WITH VARNISH I grew up in Tomorrow’s World. No, really, I did. My father was an electronics engineer, working away like a gnome in what our family called, rather unimaginatively, “The Little Room”—one stuffed to the ceiling with oscilloscopes, flashing circuit board panels and things I still can’t identify. My Dad invented, among other things, sophisticated phone surveillance gear for the cops and archery for the blind. Trust me when I tell you that I had the best-furnished imaginary spaceship of any kid on my block. There was something peculiar about the gear, though, and I noticed it even as a child. My father’s equipment cast-offs—tantalizing with their little vacuum tubes, switches and tiny lights—often had wooden panel casings. These belonged to an era in which designers still thought of electronics as furniture. A box-like TV needed its guts hidden by Formica. Your stereo (your “Hi-Fi”) had to rest in a cabinet. Back then, even the Future had wood grain. That was more important than I could imagine. I’ll get to that. Back to my formative years. By the time I was eighteen and studying journalism, our house had six computers and eight television sets—and this was still years before the Macintosh. I would come home from class to have my father enthusiastically call me over and tap his keyboard, prompting his early voice synthesizer program to greet me in a voice much like Wall-E’s: “Hell-oh, Jeff.” Actually, it was more like, “Hell-oh, Jeef.” Some fine-tuning needed to be done. I still recall cialis how long does it last, side effects of viagra, nitrates and viagra, cialis pills online, http://pharmacycanada-rxedtop.com/ my father driving model cars from his computer, the little vehicles making such a whizzing racket that my mother, trying...