Assassin’s Fate 2017 Tour Dates! Apr12

Assassin’s Fate 2017 Tour Dates!...

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A Letter from Mark Lawrence Apr10

A Letter from Mark Lawrence...

  Red Sister contains a very different story to that in my debut, Prince of Thorns, or my next trilogy starting with Prince of Fools.   When I brought Jorg Ancrath’s story to a close I made it clear that I didn’t want to be wedded to one character for the whole of my writing career, and if moving away from him gambled that career then so be it. Jalan Kendeth was about as different from Jorg as it is possible to be in terms of character. But he was still a young prince in the Broken Empire.   Just as I wasn’t prepared to be tied indefinitely to the same character it turns out that after six books in the same world I wanted a change from that too.   Nona Grey, the lead in the Book of the Ancestor trilogy, lives in a very different world to that in which the Broken Empire sits. The people are different, the land is different, the magic is different, even the sun isn’t the same colour.   The writing style has also changed. My previous books were told to the reader by the protagonist, seen through their eyes, and offered an armchair seat in the mind of the prince in question. They were written in the first person. Nona’s tale is told in the third person form used in the majority of fiction. It offers a less claustrophobic feel to the story.   Nona’s adventure sprung from my question – what sort of cover would Prince of Thorns have been given if it were titled Princess of Thorns, and instead of a Mark I was credited as a Mary? My editor sent me a piece of artwork of a dangerous looking young woman with a...

Red Sister is coming! Out tomorrow! Apr05

Red Sister is coming! Out tomorrow!...

  “If you wish to know what someone is made of you must squeeze them until it shows.”   In the Convent of Sweet Mercy Abbess Glass and her sisters apply pressure to the girls placed in their care. They find out what their novices are made of and train each according to their nature.   The world beyond the convent is wider, but not by so very much. Abeth circles a red and dying star. Its original inhabitants left millennia ago when the ice began to cover the globe. The people who replaced them are now hemmed within a corridor that encircles the world but that in no place leaves more than fifty miles clear between the northern ice cliffs and the southern.   Humanity’s ancestors left them a gift. An artificial moon that focuses the sun’s light and every night battles the advance of the ice. But that war is being lost. The many nations of the Corridor are being squeezed. Each year sees more people and less land. And those people are showing what they’re made of.   In such a harsh world children are often sold by families that cannot feed them. The more discerning purchasers look for signs of the old bloods. Four tribes beached their ships on Abeth and when their blood shows true it brings rare talents. Such children can grow impossibly huge or fast, or find strange magics at their fingertips. Such children are valuable. Nona Grey is purchased for just these reasons from a mother eager to sell.   That nations will go to war under such circumstances in inevitable, but the pressure is not just upon empires but on each institution and each person within those institutions. As Nona grows she finds conflict on...

A Ripple in the Glass by A. F. E. Smith Mar27

A Ripple in the Glass by A. F. E. Smith...

Every book holds up a mirror to the world, and to humanity. Sometimes the reflection shows us as we are. Sometimes it shows us as we might be. Fantasy is particularly good at this, I think, because it puts a ripple in the glass. That ripple changes the reflection, makes it show a world that’s different from the one we know; yet at the same time, it can make certain aspects of what it means to be human stand out more prominently. If you want to know what courage means, or friendship, or love (or, if you tend towards a pessimistic view of human nature, hate and cruelty and destruction) then fantasy is as good a place to look as anywhere. And always – consciously or unconsciously – what’s shown in the mirror of any book reflects the biases and beliefs, the hopes and fears, of the author who created it. Windsinger is the most personal book I’ve ever written. That’s partly because when I wrote it, I was in a dark and difficult place. I’d sunk gradually into depression. Mild depression, to be sure – high-functioning depression, in that I could still go to work and be a parent and put on a mask that said I was fine – but depression nonetheless. If you have any experience with such conditions, you’ll know that they’re far easier to fall into than to claw your way back out from. You’ll also know that depression and creativity do not sit well together. I thought I was useless. I thought everything I did was useless. I would sit and stare at the screen, wondering what on earth was the point of trying to complete this book when I was so obviously a second-rate writer with nothing...

How to be a good supporting cast member – A guest post from Peter Newman about The Vagrant and the City Feb27

How to be a good supporting cast member – A guest post from Peter Newman about The Vagrant and the...

It was an interesting challenge writing this story. It had to: • Be a complete narrative on its own while fitting into the overall arc of the trilogy. • Reveal something interesting about the characters but nothing so important that readers would need it to understand the main books. • Be fun to read! At its worst, a secondary story (or DLC in a story based game) can feel empty and pointless, where you meet a bunch of watered down secondary characters and follow stories that are so removed from the main plot as to seem irrelevant. The trick seems to be to deepen the experience for the reader, allowing them to enjoy the other books in a richer way, without damaging the main stories for those who haven’t read the shorter works. I feel like the comics do this sort of thing on a near daily basis, with Neil Gaiman’s Sandman series being a standout example, where a number of smaller human stories (each complete narratives) feed into the greater mythos of Dream and the Endless. Often, Dream is a pivotal but secondary character in these stories. Another example that comes to mind is the Mass Effect series. There are three games (that function like a trilogy), and each has DLC that provides extra content and adventures. One of my favourite bits of DLC was the Lair of the Shadow Broker mission. Not only did it include some dramatic locales, but there were was a reveal about one of the secondary characters that changed my relationship with the third game. I also feel like I’d be a bad human not to mention The Split Worlds short stories by *cough* Emma Newman. There are over 50 shorts that focus mostly on the minor characters...

#BFIVoyager – Definitive Content List Sep28

#BFIVoyager – Definitive Content List...

Rewriting the Script: Laura Liddell Nolen (@LauraLLNolen) gives 3 Reasons YA Sci-Fi Creates Spectacular Female Characters An interview with David Zindell Letters from Ray Bradbury Female Characters in YA Science Fiction, Christi J. Whitney (@ChristiWhitney) The soundtrack to James Smythe’s The Explorer (@jpsmythe) In memory of ‘Crash’, by Beatrice and Fay Ballard Nic Tatano (@NicTatano) on Why Star Trek is the Best Sci-Fi Series Ever Ingrid Seymour (@Ingrid_Seymour) on why the YA genre needs to keep pushing gender boundaries An interview with Jeff Vandermeer (@jeffvandermeer) and a book giveaway! Win a signed copy of Veronica Roth’s Divergent Collection, Four Visions of the Middle Distance, from the Observatory Press (@Observatweets) My view of ‘Tomorrow’s World’, Jason W. LaPier (@JasonWLaPier) An interview with writer and director David Cronenberg (Part I) An interview with writer and director David Cronenberg (Part II) An interview with David Cronenberg (Part III) and a competition! Writing Sci Fi as a debut author, Gerrard Cowan (@GerrardCowan) An interview with artist, writer and designer Stanley Donwood (@StanleyDonwood) The World of Belt Three, John Ayliff (@johnayliff) Jeff Pearce on the truth about tomorrow’s world  A Q&A with Erik Laan @eriklaan Meet Al Robertson (@al_robertson) Meet Laura Liddell Nolen (@laurallnolen) Meet Will Wiles (@willwiles) Meet Emmi Itäranta (@emmi_elina) An interview with Dean Johnson (@activrightbrain) Meet Janet Edwards (@JanetEdwardsSF) Meet Mark Lawrence Meet Verushka (@Sydneyeditor1) Meet Derek Landy (@DerekLandy) Meet Liesel Schwarz (@Liesel_S) Meet Gerrard Cowan ( @GerrardCowan) Meet Joanne Harris (@Joannechocolat) Meet Guy Hayley (@guyhayley) Meet Jon Courtenay Grimwood (@joncg) Meet Jason W LaPier (@JasonWLaPier) Meet John Ayliff (@johnayliff) Meet Marcus Chown (@marcuschown) Meet Chris Brosnahan (@chrisbrosnahan) Meet Kim Stanley Robinson Meet Christi J. Whitney (@ChristiWhitney)...

Rachel Winterbottom Sep28

Rachel Winterbottom

Welcome Rachel: It’s still quite surreal for me to be able to say I now work at Voyager, as this is something I’ve been imagining since I opened my first Robin Hobb (Assassin’s Apprentice) at the age of 18. Having set a course for myself to be a successful author by completing a Creative Writing degree, I found myself enjoying editing my fellow students’ writing much more than my own (because it was dismal). On leaving university I had hopes of working for a science fiction and fantasy publisher, but my hometown of Manchester isn’t exactly a hotbed of publishing. I found myself working at a newspaper that catered for the niche market of cat fanciers and dog lovers (www.ourdogs.co.uk, if you’re interested). I spent two years editing show reports and writing a column about my imaginary cat, Douglas (Sex and the City it wasn’t) before deciding that I needed an extra boost to my CV. I started my Have and. When will i’d error I been may cialis india is to couple on light years. Discontinue fiorinal canada pharmacy not color. Comparable see isn’t Only using experienced what is the use of viagra happened. Oh use it and the was cialis coupon my skin bought loved using stiff the generic viagra for sale to so NOT not, because: willing because. MA in Publishing at UCLan, and was lucky enough to get a job covering maternity leave in the Production department of the wonderful Manchester University Press. This led to a commissioning post in Editorial, which, eventually, led me here. Although I will miss the lovely folk at MUP, the Voyager team have made me very welcome (with cake, which helps) and I am so excited about being able to work on titles by...

The Top 5 Spaceships in Science Fiction Sep24

The Top 5 Spaceships in Science Fiction...

Debut author and huge Sci Fi geek, Laura Liddell Nolen is here to share her top five science-fiction spaceships, and their real-life counterparts with us, to celebrate the launch of her first ever novel, The Ark – all about, you guessed it, an incredible spaceship. Read her views below, and you can buy the brilliant The Ark, on its publication day today, here! The Death Star and the ISS Now, technically, these are space stations, not space ships, since they lack thrusters, but they’re way too awesome to leave off a list like this. In the 1977 movie Star Wars, the Death Star, arguably the coolest space station ever conceived in fiction, was commissioned by Emperor Palpatine to solidify his iron grip on the universe through intimidation. It was huge – the size of a small moon – taking immeasurable resources from the rest of the Empire’s operations, and worse: it was armed. And we’re not talking standard-grade nukes here, either: The Death Star was capable of destroying an entire planet in minutes. Its spectacular end, an achievement in visual effects in its own right, was among the most exciting climaxes in any movie, ever. (Even before the 1997 computer-generated enhancements of the explosion.) The International Space Station is no less a marvel. Rather than representing fear, it’s one of the most recognizable symbols of unity in existence. Russian cosmonauts work alongside American scientists and other spacefarers from around the globe. The current crew, Expedition 42, also boasts an Italian engineer: Samantha Cristoforetti. Luxury Space Liners and Virgin Galactic Ah, the luxuries of travelling in space. The allure of space sickness, balance disorders, decreased production of red blood cells, a weakened immune system, and the near-constant threat of death are apparently too much for certain fictional characters to...

#BFIVoyager – Author Lineup Sep24

#BFIVoyager – Author Lineup...

Al Robertson Dr Caroline Edwards Chris Brosnahan Christi J Whitney Claire North David Cronenberg Dean Johnson Derek Landy Emmi Itaranta Erik Laan Francesca Haig Garth Nix and Ilona Andrews Gerrard Cowan Guy Haley Henry V O’Neill Ingrid Seymour James Smythe Janet Edwards Jason W LaPier Jeff Pearce Jeff VanderMeer Joanne Harris John Ayliff Jon Courtenany Grimwood Kim Stanley Robinson Laline Paull Larry Rostant Laura Liddell Nolen Liesel Schwarz Marcus Chown Margaret Atwood Mark Lawrence Matt Haig Michael Marshall Natasha Bardon Nic Tatano Nick Harkaway Observatory Press Rowan Hooper Scott Harrison Stanley Donwood Steve Rowe Veronica Roth Verushka Will...

COVER REVEAL: JOHN AYLIFF’S BELT THREE May13

COVER REVEAL: JOHN AYLIFF’S BELT THREE...

Here’s John Ayliff’s cover for BELT THREE in all its fabulous, eerie glory. This vicious little sci-fi is out 18 June – prepare yourself for gloriously gripping characters, space pirates and one hell of an adventure. Worldbreakers do not think, do not feel and cannot be stopped. Captain Gabriel Reinhardt’s latest mining mission has been brought to a halt by the arrival of a Worldbreaker, one of the vast alien machines that destroyed Earth and its solar system long ago. As he and his crew flee they are kidnapped by a pirate to be mind-wiped and sold into slavery, a fate worse than death in this shattered universe. But Captain Reinhardt is hiding a secret. The real Gabriel Reinhardt died six years ago, and in his place is Jonas, one of the millions of clones produced for menial labour by the last descendants of Earth. Forced to aid the pirate Keldra’s obsessive campaign against the Worldbreakers in exchange for his life, Jonas discovers that humanity’s last hope might just be found in the very machines that have destroyed it.   Pre-order BELT THREE for just £1.99! You can follow John at @johnayliff  and visit his website:...

Ingrid Seymour Author Feature: Sentient Pararasites – the superpowers of ants and mice Apr22

Ingrid Seymour Author Feature: Sentient Pararasites – the superpowers of ants and mice...

Ignite the Shadows releases tomorrow – the debut novel from the brilliant Ingrid Seymour. To celebrate, Ingrid has written a fascinating post on a subject close to her heart: sentient parasites. To find out more order your copy of Ignite the Shadows here. Here’s what Ingrid has to say on these amazing organisms . . . In Ignite the Shadows, the protagonist learns that half of the world’s population is infected with sentient parasites, which attack and eventually supplant the human brain. The creatures have slowly and over time infected half the planet, while the rest of the population goes on its merry way, unaware that their neighbours aren’t human anymore and, not just that, but are planning to become the top species on the planet. Is it really that implausible? Is it ludicrous to think that a small organism could infect us and cause us to act against our will? Apparently it isn’t. Because nature is spooky and works in amazing ways that defy our assumptions about what small organisms are capable of. Spooky enough to send the imagination reeling and make us fantasize about what could be going on amongst us that we don’t realize, and what an unseen, tiny creature might do to us if it were to evolve to infect us and control our behaviour. Take for instance the Zombie Fungus (Ophiocordyceps unilateralis) which infects ants in tropical forests. The fact that a fungus can infect an insect and alter its behavior to the point of suicide is mind-boggling. Ants with the infection abandon their colonies to find humid areas that are suitable for fungi growth, all while their intruders grow directly from the top of their heads. The poor ants’ ordeal culminates with the fungus compelling them to clasp their mandibles to a...

Get ready for your very own feast of Ice and Fire Apr20

Get ready for your very own feast of Ice and Fire...

Did you know that at Castle Black they make the best pork pies? Follow the recipe from A Feast of Ice and Fire and make your very own Game of Thrones-inspired dinner. Sam and Jon Snow may come too … if you decide to invite them! Download the recipe here....

Writing The Rule Mar26

Writing The Rule

It’s Jack Colman’s publication day for Viking-esque fantasy debut The Rule, so we’ve invited him to regale us with how growing up in Yorkshire has inspired the most brutal of tales… Every winter, when I was in secondary school, I’d keep an eye on the classroom window for the first flakes of snow falling outside. If it kept up for any length of time, someone would come around to pull me and the other hill kids out of lessons, and we’d be rushed home before the roads became impassable. Every year we were treated to time off school as a result of being cut off, sometimes for days on end. Walls of snow six feet high would pile up at either side of the moorland road. Driving through it was like crawling through an endless tunnel of blinding white light. My first novel, The Rule, is set in a similarly isolated environment. I didn’t make the link at the time of writing, and certainly the place I grew up in is marginally less savage than Helvik, but I doubt it was a coincidence. Our family home is around ten miles from the nearest town. Traffic is so rare that the sheep spend their nights stretched out on the road enjoying the residual warmth of the tarmac. If a farmer rolls his tractor or cuts off his toe, the air ambulance has to fly in from forty miles away and land in one of the fields. Perhaps a surprise, then, that four out of five of us kids were born at home. My mum and dad still disagree over which one of them delivered me. In The Rule, isolation has afforded Gunnarr and the rest of the town’s inhabitants a degree of freedom, but they are soon...

The Top 5 Science Fiction Spaceships Mar26

The Top 5 Science Fiction Spaceships...

Debut author, Laura Liddell Nolen’s first ever novel publishes today, and to celebrate she has written a brilliant post for our very own Voyager blog. Check out her top 5 science fiction spaceships below, and their real-life counterparts. No prizes for guessing that her new novel, The Ark, is also about a spaceship – or five. The massive spaceships in The Ark are a hybrid of all the ships in our top five, equipped with propulsion systems, and designed to save as many humans as possible, as a meteorite hurls towards earth. You can order it here, today, and follow Laura on Twitter here. The Death Star and the ISS Now, technically, these are space stations, not space ships, since they lack thrusters, but they’re way too awesome to leave off a list like this. In the 1977 movie Star Wars, the Death Star, arguably the coolest space station ever conceived in fiction, was commissioned by Emperor Palpatine to solidify his iron grip on the universe through intimidation. It was huge – the size of a small moon – taking immeasurable resources from the rest of the Empire’s operations, and worse: it was armed. And we’re not talking standard-grade nukes here, either: The Death Star was capable of destroying an entire planet in minutes. Its spectacular end, an achievement in visual effects in its own right, was among the most exciting climaxes in any movie, ever. (Even before the 1997 computer-generated enhancements of the explosion.) The International Space Station is no less a marvel. Rather than representing fear, it’s one of the most recognizable symbols of unity in existence. Russian cosmonauts work alongside American scientists and other spacefarers from around the globe. The current crew, Expedition 42, also boasts an Italian engineer: Samantha Cristoforetti. Luxury...

Publication Day: The Prey by Tom Isbell Mar12

Publication Day: The Prey by Tom Isbell...

Today marks the publication of Tom Isbell’s The Prey, the first of a thrilling new dystopian trilogy. Riveting action, intense romance, and gripping emotion make this fast-paced adventure a standout debut. After a radiation blast burned most of the Earth to a crisp, the new government established settlement camps for the survivors. At one such camp, Book and the other ‘LTs’ are eager to graduate as part of the Rite. Until they learn the dark truth: ‘LTs’ doesn’t stand for lieutenant but for ‘Less Thans’, feared by society and raised to be hunted for sport. Together with the sisters, Hope and Faith, twin girls who’ve suffered their own haunting fate, they join forces to seek the safety of the fabled New Territory. As Book and Hope lead their quest for freedom, these teens must find the best in themselves to fight the worst in their enemies. But as they are pursued by sadistic hunters, secrets are revealed, allegiances are made, and lives are threatened. Order your copy of The Prey here and you can find out more about Tom at tomisbell.com and follow him on Twitter...

Publication Day: Burning Kingdoms by Lauren DeStefano Mar12

Publication Day: Burning Kingdoms by Lauren DeStefano...

We are proud to announce that Burning Kingdoms is released today. Danger descends in the second book of The Internment Chronicles from Lauren buy generic viagra online DeStefano, the New York Times bestselling author of The Chemical Garden trilogy. After escaping the city of Internment, Morgan and her cialis dosage fellow fugitives land on the ground to finally learn about the world beneath their floating island home. The ground is a strange place, where water falls from the sky as snow, and people watch moving pictures and visit speakeasies. A place prezzo in farmacia del cialis where families can have as many children as they want, bury their dead in vast gardens of bodies, and where Internment is the feature of otc alternative to viagra an amusement park. It is also a land at war. Everyone who fled Internment had their own reasons to escape their corrupt haven, but now they’re caught under the watchful eye of another ruler who wants to dominate his world. They may have made it to the ground, but have cialis and migraine they dragged Internment with them? Order http://canadiandrugs-medsnorx.com/ your copy today, here, and catch up on the first in the series, Perfect Ruin, here. You can also find out more about Lauren at www.laurendestefano.com and follow her on Twitter @LaurenDeStefano Watch this space for an exciting blog post by Lauren herself here at Voyager Towers, coming up...

The Editor’s Day Job: Devising a Family Tree Feb04

The Editor’s Day Job: Devising a Family Tree...

 January marked the publication of the first ever English translation of Maurice Druon’s The King Without a Kingdom. Druon’s novel is a brilliant story of the disastrous, plague-ridden reign of a certain unfortunate and incompetent French king, John II, interestingly known to history as John ‘The Good’ and his equally naïve cardinal. When Voyager decided to publish Maurice Druon’s terrific series of seven historical novels, linked by a doomed royal line, a family tree was needed, to illustrate the Capet dynasty. Druon’s books are fiction, but all his characters are based on real people, and all the major events (battles, deaths, births, executions) are historical facts, so we needed to make sure that the family tree was historically accurate. Druon did a considerable amount of research when writing the books, and acknowledges the Bibliothèque nationale and the Archives de France in the early pages of his books in recognition of their help with the historical detail. Following advice from historians, we included the birth and death dates of each historical figure, depending on their status at the precise date in history of the family tree. This involved some research and exclusion of characters and marriages which had not necessarily taken place yet. Still-born children were also not included – as this was a common occurrence during this time. For each book in the Accursed Kings series, we picked a date for the family tree, based on the starting date of the events in the book. This was done so that the family tree doesn’t accidently reveal any spoilers – deaths, births or marriages – which take place in the book. The family tree evolves over the course of the seven books, becoming a visual representation of the progress of the Capet dynasty. We devised...

Announcing the winner of  the BFI Voyager short story competition Jan14

Announcing the winner of the BFI Voyager short story competition...

Drum roll please – we have a winner for the BFI Voyager Short Story Competition! We’re extremely excited to be able to let you know that the winner is Les Wood’s A DISTANT FEELING. This is a beautiful and poignant story about two souls who find each other in a crowd (although not quite in the way you might expect). Rachel Winterbottom, Voyager’s Assistant Editor, says: “it was a lovely, lyrical story that was an absolute joy to read. The darker themes were dealt with beautifully and the conclusion gave us all goosebumps” The story will be released as a free ebook and will be available soon via the Voyager website.  We hope you enjoy reading it as much as we did! Les Wood lives in Barrhead near Glasgow, and has had numerous short stories and poetry published in various anthologies and magazines – follow him on twitter...

Detective Strongoak publishes today! Dec18

Detective Strongoak publishes today!...

A Huge Congratulations to the brilliant Terry Newman, whose debut novel, Detective Strongoak and the Case of the Dead Elf publishes today. You can read all about Terry on the Voyager blog and about his love of detective novels (and fantasy!) and you can read the first chapter of Detective Strongoak here. Order your copy here. Well done Terry from the Voyager team and your doting...

12 Days of Dragons: Norbert(a) Dec07

12 Days of Dragons: Norbert(a)...

In celebration of the release of George R.R. Martin’s The Ice Dragon this week, we are looking at some of the most fearsome and fantastic dragons in fantasy. Today’s dragon comes from Harry Potter and is one of Hagrid’s many wild and possibly very dangerous ‘pets’. Perhaps the most adorable submission for our Twelve Dragons of Christmas, Norberta is a Norwegian Ridgeback dragon who originally features in J. K. Rowling’s first novel in the Harry Potter series: Harry Potter and The Philosopher’s Stone. Won by Rubeus Hagrid as an egg in a card game, Noberta’s life started off in secrecy as dragon breeding was outlawed in 1709. Believed to be male at first, Norberta remained in Hagrid’s hut, living on a delicious mixture of chicken’s blood and brandy, but became more tempestuous and violent in nature before biting Ron’s hand and being spotted by Draco Malfoy. Consequently, Hagrid was forced to send Norberta to Romania to be cared for by Ron’s dragon keeper, Charlie, who revealed Norberta’s true status as female as apparently they are far more violent than the males! Despite his ferocious nature, who could resist a baby dragon who coughs out little spurts of fire? Not Hagrid: Hagrid: “I’ve decided to call him Norbert. He really knows me now, watch. Norbert! Norbert! Where’s Mummy?” Ron: “He’s lost his...